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Tagged with Inductee Profiles & Insights

Larry Roberts Calls Himself the Founder of the Internet. Who Are You to Argue?

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Lawrence Roberts calls himself the founder of the Internet. And it’s hard to argue with him. In 1966, the U.S. Department of Defense hired Roberts to design the ARPAnet, a computer network that would connect various research outfits across the country. He based the network on a brand-new concept...

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How an Art Historian Helped Bring the Internet to Japan

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Building a computer network in space, as Google’s Vint Cerf has proposed, is all well and good, but Toru Takahashi wants to foster better digital communication much closer to home. “Cerf is very eager for interplanetary communication, I think some kind of inner-mind communication is what’s needed...

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Why Do We Call Them Internet Packets? His Name Was Donald Davies

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The fundamental technology underpinning the Internet is called packet-switching. And Donald Davies was the first one to call it that. In the mid-1960s, Davies was a researcher with Britain’s National Physical...

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What Do the H-Bomb and Internet Have In Common? Paul Baran

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Paul Baran set out to build a means of communication that could survive a nuclear war. And he ended up inventing the fundamental networking techniques that underpin the internet. In the early 1960s — as an engineer with the RAND Corporation, the U.S. armed-forces think tank founded in the wake of...

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Daniel Karrenberg Helped Bring the Internet to Europe; Now He Keeps It Running

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While Lawrence Landweber, Vint Cerf, and Bob Kahn were setting up America’s earliest network connections, across the Atlantic in Amsterdam, Daniel Karrenberg was building what would become Europe’s first intercontinental network. Arguably, Karrenberg’s contributions, coupled with innovations from...

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How Pacific Island Missile Tests Helped Launch the Internet

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There are a thousand stories about the origin of the Internet, each with their own starting point and their own heroes. Charles Herzfeld’s tale began in 1961 on a series of tiny islands in the South Pacific. The U.S. military was test-firing a series of ballistic missiles at the island chain, known...

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Alexandria 2.0: One Millionaire’s Quest to Build the Biggest Library on Earth

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Here’s the problem with libraries. They catch on fire really easily. As such, they were the prized targets of the invading hordes of antiquity – the model collections of knowledge of their times, whose only fault was their inherent flammability. They were one-man, one-torch jobs. But the hordes...

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Bob Kahn, the Bread Truck, and the Internet’s First Communion

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The world’s first Internet transmission occurred on October 29, 1969. At least, that’s what some people believe. Others say the more important moment arrived eight years later, when a repurposed delivery van equipped with a wireless transmitter sent a message from San Francisco to Norway and back...

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Lawrence Landweber Helped Build Today’s Internet, Now He’s Advising Its Future

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When Lawrence Landweber created the Computer Science Network (CSNET), an intentionally open computer network that helped pave the way for the modern Internet, he knew one day its technology would be used in banking, travel, and commerce. He didn’t predict that the unsecure network he built would...

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Why Does the Net Still Work on Christmas? Paul Mockapetris

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In 1983, you could ask for your own internet address. But not after 6 p.m. California time. Or over the Christmas holiday. When the internet was still the ARPAnet — the government-funded network that connected various research outfits across the country — you couldn’t get an address without the...

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