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March 22, 2016 | 0 comments

Ever wonder about the volume of communication the Internet enables? One designer, Steven Lewis, decided to bring this volume to life in a representative graphic that shows you that volume in 'One Second on the Internet.'

Lewis contrasts this real-time perspective with that of the Internet's history, writing: "10 years ago Skype, Facebook, YouTube, Reddit, Twitter, Tumblr, Dropbox and Instagram didn't exist. 20 years ago there were only 130 websites total, Google wasn't even around yet, and you had to pay for an email account through an ISP. 30 years ago there was no Internet."

Many thanks to the Internet pioneers who have enabled this growth and innovation!


March 22, 2016 | 0 comments

What websites or mobile applications are favored by the people who have helped build and shape the Internet? Turns out, the answer ranges from the extremely technical to the surprisingly common (because even Internet pioneers contend with the mundane challenges of modern life).

 1.      feedly

Craig Newmark, who was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame in the inaugural 2012 class, is perhaps best known as the founder of the classifieds advertisement behemoth Craiglist.com, but anyone who follows him on Twitter knows he’s also an avid news consumer and advocate for quality journalism. So it’s no surprise that his favorite website is feedly.com, an app that allows you to compile, organize and share content from your favorite sites, including news sites and blogs. Says Craig: “I use feedly pretty compulsively. It's a great way to track and follow my favorite news and related feeds. For example, I use it to follow Political Wire, which summarizes political news really well, and also Dilbert and Doonesbury.”

He’s pretty serious about following Dilbert, which—as he wrote...

March 7, 2016 | 0 comments

As news of Ray Tomlinson’s untimely passing reverberates across an Internet that he helped to create, the Internet Hall of Fame wanted to take some time to share its memories of Ray and his groundbreaking contributions to the way we communicate.

In 2012, when Ray was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame’s inaugural class, he shared in his acceptance speech the moment he realized the full impact of his work.

It came in 1996, over 20 years after he’d developed the first network application for email, but it truly exemplified how he—and many other Internet Hall of Fame inductees—viewed the importance of their work:  it was always about people.

Ray told the story of a reference librarian from the Institute of Standards and Technology, who had interviewed him for a monthly organizational newsletter. After learning about his email contributions in her interview, she outreached to him a few months later in a follow-up email with the subject line, “Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!”

But this email wasn’t about work. It was another matter entirely.

She explained that she had a relative who was sick with a...

February 16, 2016 | 0 comments

‘Is the solution to solving Internet privacy technological, social or political?’ This is the question the Internet Hall of Fame posed to inductee Paul Vixie in a conversation that – appropriately enough – coincided with Privacy Day January 28.

Dr. Vixie is no newcomer to the privacy issue. He is responsible for designing, implementing and deploying several DNS (Domain Name System) protocol extensions and applications that are used throughout the Internet today, including dynamic update, network reputation and BIND open-source software.

BIND in particular, which stands for Berkeley Internet Name Domain, is the most widely used DNS software on the Internet today. Vixie’s extensions allowed the DNS to scale beyond the original design and incorporate the first elements of security. (Among numerous other accomplishments, he also founded the first anti-spam non-profit, Mail Abuse Prevention System).

The simplicity of the question that we posed belies the complexity of the answer. As Dr. Vixie notes in his response, below, the privacy issue is a “moving, multidimensional target.” But he clearly outlines the multidimensional issues that must be addressed if our global society is to effectively protect the privacy of Internet users today and...

February 9, 2016 | 0 comments

Looking back now, some of the Internet's founders wonder if they should have left guidance on how the network should "grow up," according to a recent interview by PRI with inductee David Clark and others.

“We clearly couldn’t anticipate how big it was going to be,” Mr. Clark tells the publication. “Whenever I go back and read things that I wrote or others in the group wrote about planning for the future we consistently underestimated what was going to happen."

In the story, David Clark and others who are interviewed offer Internet users a warning, practical suggestions for development and comparisons for the Internet with the Homestead Act of 1862.

Read or listen to the interview on PRI here.