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February 9, 2016 | 0 comments

Looking back now, some of the Internet's founders wonder if they should have left guidance on how the network should "grow up," according to a recent interview by PRI with inductee David Clark and others.

“We clearly couldn’t anticipate how big it was going to be,” Mr. Clark tells the publication. “Whenever I go back and read things that I wrote or others in the group wrote about planning for the future we consistently underestimated what was going to happen."

In the story, David Clark and others who are interviewed offer Internet users a warning, practical suggestions for development and comparisons for the Internet with the Homestead Act of 1862.

Read or listen to the interview on PRI here.

February 9, 2016 | 0 comments

In a recent blog post and subsequent 'Ask Me Anything' on Reddit, inductee John Perry Barlow commemorates the 20th anniversary of his 'A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace' manifesto.

As reported by Inverse, when John Perry Barlow is asked on the AMA if he thinks there should be limits to online speech, he summarizes the challenge:  

“I don’t know how to limit speech on the Internet, that’s the issue. I don’t know a way to limit one form of speech, without limiting any form of speech. Besides, as John Stuart Mill said, liberty resides in the rights in that person’s views which you find most odious. And if you can’t defend the expressions that trouble you, you’ll have a hard time defending your own when they trouble someone else.”

Read the full article here.

January 12, 2016 | 0 comments

“It’s no accident that Iowa, where the first transcontinental railroad began, is now home to a huge data-center industry,” writes Ingrid Burrington in this article for The Atlantic.

Burrington, visiting the American town where the Union Pacific route for the first transcontinental railroad began, examines how networks follow networks, and that while these "ghosts" aren’t always obvious, they form an historical  infrastructure that has forged a literal and figurative path to our technological future.

December 21, 2015 | 0 comments

One of the most interesting historical features of the Internet is that the protocols were—and still are—free and open to anyone to build upon. Anyone with a good idea was (and is) encouraged to make suggestions for new or improved Internet protocols.

One of the key ways this happens is through the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). The IETF is the principal organization engaged in the development of new Internet standard specifications, and the way it does this is uniquely transparent and democratic.

Just as the Internet is shaped by its users, the work of the IETF is determined by its own participants—and any individual with relevant experience can participate. Drawing on extensive technical experience developing, deploying, and using Internet technology, IETF participants include network designers, engineers, operators, vendors, and researchers from around the world who care about the evolution and operation of Internet architecture. 

Good ideas come in all shapes and...

December 8, 2015 | 0 comments

As we head into the holiday shopping season, a new video from Shopify offers an interesting glimpse into e-commerce history. So, what was the first thing ever sold on the Internet? Read Fast Company's introduction, and then watch "Proceed to Checkout: The Unexpected Story of How E-Commerce Started."