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November 22, 2021 | 0 comments

There’s no question the global pandemic tested the integrity, durability, and reach of the Internet in ways we couldn’t have previously imagined. 

Only now do we collectively understand that our future is inextricably linked to the future of the global network and its ability to connect us to work, to school, and to each other. 

In the context of this new reality, the 2021 return of the Internet Hall of Fame is that much more significant. 

Now in its tenth year, the annual awards program’s focus on individuals who have made sure the Internet could perform under even the most extreme circumstances is more relevant than ever. 

This year’s inductee class honors 21 people from 11 countries who have built, optimized, and strengthened the foundational infrastructure of the network for reach, access, security, and scale. 

We are excited to announce that we’ll be convening to reveal and recognize these individuals in an online awards ceremony on 14 December through a LiveStream broadcast starting at 14:00 UTC. We’ll also be chronicling event highlights on the Internet Hall of Fame’s social media channels on Twitter@Internet_HOF...

October 26, 2021 | 0 comments

Vint Cerf wants to bring the Internet to the stars – literally. 

Part of the Internet Hall of Fame’s inaugural class, Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols. Since 2005, he has been a vice president and “Chief Internet Evangelist” for Google, promoting the web’s capabilities.  

In a recent interview with Data Center Dynamics Magazine, Cerf talked about his efforts for more than two decades to expand delay tolerant networking protocols into space, thus creating the backbone for an inter-stellar Internet. 

“Well, to the degree we're interested in exploring the solar system and understanding the physics of the world we live in, space exploration is certainly increasingly now considered a valuable enterprise from the scientific point of view,” he said.

“And in order to effectively support manned and robotic space exploration, you need communications, both for command of the spacecraft and to get the data back. And if you can't get the data back, why the hell are we going out there?”

September 21, 2021 | 0 comments

When it comes to the future of the Internet, Doug Comer has moved past hope...and on to expectation.

A 2019 inductee into the Internet Hall of Fame, Comer wrote the first series of textbooks explaining the scientific principles underlying the Internet’s design and communications protocols.

In a recent video interview, Comer said that his initial early hopes for the Internet, including reliable public access, were surpassed years ago. He is now banking on a future that includes infrastructural improvements that facilitate greater network access. 

“In terms of hopes, I’d say I have expectations that things will continue to get better in terms of technology,” he said. “We will have faster, more reliable, ubiquitous Internet everywhere, all the time.”


  

September 9, 2021 | 0 comments

When you listen to Klaas Wierenga talk about the development of eduroam, the access tool that provides academics and researchers with wifi roaming services at campuses around the world, you hear one phrase over and over again: “So I said, ‘Sure!’”

That spirit of affirmation is what made the development of eduroam possible. Saying “yes” to working together is what the system is all about. In fact, Wierenga calls eduroam “the poster child for collaboration.”

Launched in 2002, eduroam is currently available in 106 territories around the globe, connecting hundreds of academic institutions. Travelling students, faculty, and staff log in via their home-institution network no matter what campus they happen to be on. End-to-end encryption means that private-user credentials are only available to the home institution.

In addition to giving visitors wifi access, eduroam relieves the host institution from having to provide guest access. eduroam can also be used as an institution’s complete wireless network to serve its own campus.

The man who planted the eduroam seed that “grew into a very big flower,” as Wierenga puts it, was an indifferent high school student. “I would pass every year with the absolute minimum,” he says. The university environment, though, sparked his interest. Wierenga performed his government-...

August 25, 2021 | 0 comments

Thirty years ago, the World Wide Web was in its infancy. 

In a retrospective piece for ZDNet in commemoration of the 30th anniversary of Internet Hall of Fame inductee Tim Berners-Lee turning on a server that would become the World Wide Web, Steven Vaughan-Nichols noted that that action dramatically changed the world. 

Prior to that server being turned on in August 1991, Internet access was limited to the military, scientists, researchers, and academics. Within two years, the public was starting to learn about the Internet and its potential uses. 

Vaughan-Nichols wrote about the web’s launch in the early 1990s and acknowledged that at the time, he didn’t completely grasp the magnitude of what he was covering. 

“It was, after all, created to help scientists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, share search, not share cat pictures,” Vaughan-...

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